This Just In: Reference

Five Recently-Arrived Titles from the Reference Section:

New Ways to Kill Your Mother : Writers and Their Families – Colm Tóibín

In this wonderfully entertaining and enlightening collection, Colm Tóibín not only explores the often tense relationship between writers and their families but also conveys, with a rare tenderness and wit, the great joy of reading their work. Here is W.B. Yeats harshly responding to his own father’s literary efforts; Thomas Mann ruining his children’s prospects; Tennessee Williams haunted by his sister’s mental illness; and John Cheever being beastly to his wife.

How Literature Saved My Life – David Shields

In this wonderfully intelligent, stunningly honest, painfully funny book, acclaimed writer David Shields uses himself as a representative for all readers and writers who seek to find salvation in literature.

Blending confessional criticism and anthropological autobiography, Shields explores the power of literature (from Blaise Pascal’s Pensees to Maggie Nelson’s Bluets, Renata Adler’s Speedboat to Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past) to make life survivable, maybe even endurable. Shields evokes his deeply divided personality (his ‘ridiculous’ ambivalence), his character flaws, his woes, his serious despairs. Books are his life raft, but when they come to feel un-lifelike and archaic, he revels in a new kind of art that is based heavily on quotation and consciousness. And he shares with us a final irony: he wants ‘literature to assuage human loneliness, but nothing can assuage human loneliness. Literature doesn’t lie about this-which is what makes it essential.’

A captivating, thought-provoking, utterly original way of thinking about the essential acts of reading and writing.

A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations – Kate L. Turabian

Dewey. Bellow. Strauss. Friedman. The University of Chicago has been the home of some of the most important thinkers of the modern age. But perhaps no name has been spoken with more respect than Turabian. The dissertation secretary at Chicago for decades, Kate Turabian literally wrote the book on the successful completion and submission of the student paper. Her Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, created from her years of experience with research projects across all fields, has sold more than seven million copies since it was first published in 1937.

Now, with this seventh edition, Turabian’s Manual has undergone its most extensive revision, ensuring that it will remain the most valuable handbook for writers at every level—from first-year undergraduates, to dissertation writers apprehensively submitting final manuscripts, to senior scholars who may be old hands at research and writing but less familiar with new media citation styles. Gregory G. Colomb, Joseph M. Williams, and the late Wayne C. Booth—the gifted team behind The Craft of Research—and the University of Chicago Press Editorial Staff combined their wide-ranging expertise to remake this classic resource. They preserve Turabian’s clear and practical advice while fully embracing the new modes of research, writing, and source citation brought about by the age of the Internet.

Complete Flags of the World

Helps to discover the flags of the world ranging from Antigua to New Zealand that is published in association with the Flag Institute. This title also helps to find out about over 300 national, international, official and provincial flags from across the globe. It also features flags of major international organizations.

What You Need to Know Now: the World in Facts, Stats, and Graphics

Helps your children learn about our world and its people. This book features illustrations telling the story of our modern world, from a skyscraper skyline scaled to show the population density of cities to a pyramid chart showing the youngest and oldest populations by country.