ABC’s Gift Ideas: For Companies

The gift-giving season is upon us – hooray!

The ABC Staff has rummaged through their sections and order lists, and come up with another year’s worth of wonderful gift ideas for you: from fiction to history to cookbooks to children’s books to travel to non-books and onwards.

In a series of blog posts and recommendation lists throughout the coming month, you will find what we think will make great gifts, whether you celebrate Sinterklaas, Christmas or just like giving books to people. 🙂

In this year’s  first post we will be highlighting books that we think might make great gifts for companies.  We have these titles available in large quantities, and some of them are even signed by the author from when they visited our store this year.

Our large quantity discount will apply, of course:

  • 10 – 19 copies (of 1 title) = 15% discount
  • 30 – 59 copies = 20% discount
  • more than 59 copies = 25% discount

We are ready as ever to be your personal shoppers again this year, and hope you will find our selections useful and inspiring!

You can find our gift ideas from previous years here, and be sure to have a look at our ABC Favorites, too.

Gift Ideas for Companies

What Gap? A Communication Tool Box – Jessie Gordon

This book is a communication tool box for people who wish to take the lead and make a difference. It identifies the essential building blocks and takes you along the path of successfully implementing them.

A deciding factor in choosing to work with a person or organisation will be when we can create trust. Without the ‘click’ trust evaporates… In today’s globalised economies it is common to collaborate within a mix of national differences; to be effective each one of us will need to increase communication sensitivity and flexibility to reduce or close the cultural divide.

The Monocle Guide to Better Living – Monocle Magazine

Monocle is one of the most successful magazines to be developed in the past decade. Armed with an unmistakable sense of aesthetics and journalistic tenacity, its team — led by editor-in-chief tyler Brûlé –has created an intelligent publication that continually inspires a global readership who are interested in everything from diplomacy to design. For its first-ever book, the editorial team looks at one of their core themes: how to live well. The result is The Monocle Guide to Better Living, an original, informative, and entertaining collection of writing, reports, and recommendations.

Amsterdam: A Short History of the World’s Most Liberal City – Russell Shorto

In this effortlessly erudite account, Russell Shorto traces the idiosyncratic evolution of Amsterdam, showing how such disparate elements as herring anatomy, naked Anabaptists parading through the streets, and an intimate gathering in a sixteenth-century wine-tasting room had a profound effect on Dutch – and world – history. Weaving in his own experiences of his adopted home, Shorto provides an ever-surprising, intellectually engaging story of Amsterdam from the building of its first canals in the 1300s, through its brutal struggle for independence, its golden age as a vast empire, to its complex present in which its cherished ideals of liberalism are under siege.

Just Kids – Patti Smith

A prelude to fame, Just Kids recounts the friendship of two young artists–Patti Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe – whose passion fueled their lifelong pursuit of art.

In 1967, a chance meeting between two young people led to a romance and a lifelong friendship that would carry each to international success never dreamed of. The backdrop is Brooklyn, Chelsea Hotel, Max’s Kansas City, Scribner’s Bookstore, Coney Island, Warhol’s Factory and the whole city resplendent. Among their friends, literary lights, musicians and artists such as Harry Smith, Bobby Neuwirth, Allen Ginsberg, Sandy Daley, Sam Shepherd, William Burroughs, etc. It was a heightened time politically and culturally; the art and music worlds exploding and colliding. In the midst of all this two kids made a pact to always care for one another. Scrappy, romantic, committed to making art, they prodded and provided each other with faith and confidence during the hungry years–the days of cous-cous and lettuce soup.

Just Kids begins as a love story and ends as an elegy. Beautifully written, this is a profound portrait of two young artists, often hungry, sated only by art and experience. And an unforgettable portrait of New York, her rich and poor, hustlers and hellions, those who made it and those whose memory lingers near.

Stuff You Can’t Bottle : Advertising for the Global Youth Market – King Adz

In the networked, multimedia era of Internet 2.0, the only way for advertisers and brands to connect with the notoriously difficult youth market is to get involved with the cultures and subcultures that make up their world. In this book, the author shares his insight into the lives of young people across the globe.

The Pocket Scavenger – Keri Smith

From the creator of Wreck This Journal, an exploration into the creative process and chance. Readers are instructed to go on an unusual scavenger hunt, collecting a spectrum of random items. They’ll be forced out of habitual ways of thinking to discover new connections.

In the City of Bikes: The Story of the Amsterdam Cyclist – Pete Jordan

Pete Jordan, author of Dishwasher: One Man’s Quest to Wash Dishes in All Fifty States, is back with a memoir that tells the story of his love affair with Amsterdam, the city of bikes, all the while unfolding an unknown history of the city’s cycling.

Undutchables 7.0 – Colin White & Laurie Boucke

A hilarious yet profound and revealing look at the Dutch, their customs and their mentality. This exquisite satire explores the most diverse aspects of daily Dutch life, from coffee to child rearing, from train travel to the toilet.

Learn why the Dutch believe, ‘It is better to debate a question without settling it than to settle a question without debating it,’ and why it’s so hard to learn the Dutch language, ‘The more you try to learn Dutch, the more the Dutch refuse to speak Dutch to you and the more they complain that you haven’t learned it.’

Other topics include Dutch moralizing & criticizing, cozy Dutch homes, flowers & plants, money & thriftiness, work ethics, welfare, commercial cunning, telephone habits, the national passion, rules for shopping, driving, Dutch customs, bikes, language, gay community, food, sex, drugs, phobias, the Dutch abroad and flood disasters.